The Wedding Gift by Marlen Suyapa Bodden

I received this book from the publisher in exchange for a fair and honest review. 

Photo Credit: Goodreads

I have just been loving dual narrative novels lately.  I can’t believe how many I have read, most in a row, and honestly, I seem to love each and every one of them.

The Wedding Gift by Marlen Suyapa Bodden is one of those dual narrative novels.

The Wedding Gift is the story of Sarah Campbell, a slave during the 1850s, whose father is the plantation owner.  Sarah is the playmate to and the maid of Clarissa, her half-sister.  Although this isn’t fully known to them at the time (but don’t worry, you find out soon enough, so it’s not giving anything away!).

The other narrative is told by Theodora Allen, the mistress of the plantation.

Sarah’s not happy as a slave.  But why should she be?  And Theodora seems to be a little too free-thinking as a mistress.

The Wedding Gift kept me hooked for most of the story.  At one point, maybe 3/4 of the way through, it lagged a little.  However, the ending twist was completely shocking and made up for the lag.

This would be a good novel for you to read if you’re a fan of The Help by Kathryn Stockett or The Kitchen House by Kathleen Grissom.

If my review doesn’t at least intrigue you, the positive feedback from authors like Tom Wolfe and Kathleen Grissom should at least pique your interest.

This book comes out today, so make sure you pick up your copy of the novel.

Are you a fan of the dual narrative novel?

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Interested in getting your own copy? Check out The Wedding Gift on Amazon & IndieBound. I get a small percentage if you purchase from those links, and it doesn’t cost you any extra.

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21 thoughts on “The Wedding Gift by Marlen Suyapa Bodden

    • Yes, these narrators are in no way at all love interests! I actually don’t read anything romance at all, it’s soooo not my thing. If there is any sort of love story, I’ll only read it if it’s a teeeeensy piece of the story, with a strong storyline that is not romance to carry it through.

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